Past Courses

Feel free to view our past course offerings and descriptions below. For current & upcoming courses, please click here.

Summer 2017 Classes

Early Prevention of Mass Atrocities (MAHG/GPC 5038 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Tibi Galis
Date: June 28 – August 9, 2017
Location: Course Online (Fulfills MAHG & GPC elective)

This course will offer answers to some crucial questions regarding the prevention of mass atrocities before the risk of atrocities taking place is high: What does atrocity prevention look like before the risk is imminent? What is the role of the UN, the US Government, and other international peacebuilding actors? How do governments and civil society within the country at risk ensure that latent tensions do not escalate? Beyond the international frame for prevention, the course will focus in detail on the overlap between human rights policy, educational policy and economic policy and their relationship with the prevention of mass atrocities.

History of Genocide (MAHG/GPC 5001 – 3 credits)
Instructor: Elisa von Joeden-Forgey
Date: May 15 – July 26, 2017
Location: Online (Fulfills MAHG & GPC requirement)

This course is a Genocide Prevention Certificate (GPC) requirement. In this course we will seek to address the challenge of an “early warning system” through the historical study of modern genocide with an emphasis on the historical connections between various cases of genocide. We will also examine causes of genocidal processes, possible preventative measures, and social healing after the fact. Particular focus will be on the Ottoman Armenians, the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Argentina, but other cases will also be examined, including the genocides of indigenous populations during the era of European expansion, of Kurds in Iraq, of Mayan Indians in Guatemala, of East Timorese under Indonesian domination, of Muslims in Kosovo, and of Darfuris in Sudan. Using scholarly texts, fiction, film, and other media, we will discuss the definition of genocide and its representation, the long- and short-term historical contexts that enable genocide, the question of the uniqueness of the Holocaust and the value of “comparative genocide studies,” the problem of prevention and intervention, and the relationship between genocide and other forms of social and political violence.

Religion and Genocide Prevention (MAHG/GPC 5040 – 3 credits)
Instructor: Carol A. Rittner
Date: May 15 – July 26, 2017
Location: Online  (Fulfills MAHG & GPC elective)

In the 20th and 21st centuries, the international community has witnessed how religion can be used to incite genocide and other mass atrocity crimes: Armenia, Nazi Germany, former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Central African Republic (CAR), Nigeria, Cambodia, Myanmar – the list could go on and on. Too often in these and other places in our world religion has been a destructive social and political force propelling genocide and mass atrocities, instead of being a positive force to prevent them. The question is: Can religion play a role in preventing genocide and other mass atrocity crimes? If so, how? If not, why not?

Religion & Genocide Prevention, an online graduate seminar in the Genocide Prevention Certificate Program, will examine the intersection between religion and mass atrocity crimes, including genocide, and genocide prevention. What is genocide prevention? What is religion? Does religion help to normalize genocide by providing myths of ultimate redemption or rationales for annihilation? Are there specific theological ideas particularly important to the perpetrators of genocide and mass atrocity crimes? What about to those who tried to prevent genocide? These are some of the questions we will explore, examine, and discuss in this course.

Spring 2017

Aftermath: Transitional Justice and Collective Memory in the Wake of Genocide (MAHG/GPC 5039 – 3 credits)
Instructor: Kerry Whigham
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017                                                                                             Location: Online

This course will examine the various ways societies can and have dealt with past violence and human rights abuses—a field otherwise known as transitional justice. The course will focus both on traditionally recognized modes of transitional justice (criminal prosecutions, truth confessions, institutional reform, and reparations), but also more novel forms that are not as often discussed (memorialization and the creation of memory sites, cultural outreach, economic reform, and education). We will develop a deeper understanding of “collective memory” and its role in transitional justice and prevention. Finally, the course will place a special emphasis on the (potential) role of civil society and grassroots activism in shaping transitional justice strategies.

History of Genocide (MAHG 5001/GPC 5001 – 3 credits)
Instructor: Elisa von Joeden-Forgey
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017
Location: Online

In this course we will seek to address the challenge of an “early warning system” through the historical study of modern genocide with an emphasis on the historical connections between various cases of genocide. We will also examine causes of genocidal processes, possible preventative measures, and social healing after the fact. Particular focus will be on the Ottoman Armenians, the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Argentina, but other cases will also be examined, including the genocides of indigenous populations during the era of European expansion, of Kurds in Iraq, of Mayan Indians in Guatemala, of East Timorese under Indonesian domination, of Muslims in Kosovo, and of Darfuris in Sudan. Using scholarly texts, fiction, film, and other media, we will discuss the definition of genocide and its representation, the long- and short-term historical contexts that enable genocide, the question of the uniqueness of the Holocaust and the value of “comparative genocide studies,” the problem of prevention and intervention, and the relationship between genocide and other forms of social and political violence.

Rescuers and Bystanders (MAHG 5002 – 3 credits)
Instructor: Raz Segal
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017 | Monday | 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing, Holocaust Resource Center Classroom

What is the role of good people in difficult times? Do dictatorships like that of the Nazi Third Reich induce a kind of mass psychosis that transforms some people into brutes and others into passive bystanders? Do people have choices, or are we all victims, be it of oppression, war, genocide, or “fate”? This seminar examines the factors that shape the behavior of ordinary people and institutions – specifically, the Christian churches – during a time of extreme violence like the Holocaust and other genocides of the 20th and 21st centuries. It encourages students to ask what it takes to move “ordinary people” from indifference to action on behalf of others.

Selected Topics with the Ida E. King Distinguished Scholar of Holocaust Studies: After the Shoah: Memory, Memoirs, and Second Generation Literature (MAHG 5007-3 credits)
Instructor: Elizabeth R. Baer
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017 | Tuesday | 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing, Holocaust Resource Center Classroom

In this class, we will examine Holocaust memoirs, film, art installations, historical texts, fiction and photographs to look at ways in which survivors, writers, and artists have reacted to and responded to the Holocaust. We will discuss the concept of Vergangenheitsbewältigung, the term invented by the Germans for “coming to terms with the past.” We will also focus on controversies in the field of literary studies: for example, should we write fiction about the Holocaust (Elie Wiesel said NO!) or only history and memoir? Do survivors always tell the “truth” when writing their memoirs? What about the validity of second generation literature, written by the children of survivors, and the concept of postmemory? How should one understand recent writing by Germans about their “suffering” during the Third Reich? What about comparing other genocides to the Holocaust? Our class will be discussion-based; students will be asked to write one short essay and a research paper.

Study Seminar to the Sites (MAHG 5022- 3 Credits)
Instructor: Michael R. Hayse
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017 | Wednesday | 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus F Wing, 120

The Netherlands and France: World Wars in Western Europe. The Study Tour may serve as a Capstone Experience. Under the guidance of a qualified specialist, this course offers a study seminar combined with travel to Holocaust sites in Europe. In addition to other assignments, students produce a research paper or equivalent project on a designated topic related to the sites included on the travel itinerary.

Genocide Watch Internship (MAHG 5990 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Elisa von Joeden-Forgey
Date: January 17 – May 8, 2017
Location: TBD

Open only to graduate students and undergraduate students with permission. Not open to Genocide Prevention Certificate students. This course is an internship opportunity connected with the online warning system called Genocide Watch. Students will be trained in research and writing about contemporary cases of genocide in a professional policy-oriented setting. Various interpretive protocols will be used, including the UN’s Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes, The Ten Stages of Genocide, the Political Instability Task Force risk assessments, and other databases. The course will meet at least 5 times during the semester and students are expected to put in 10 work hours a week in the Genocide Watch office in Atlantic City.

Fall 2016
Europe in the 20th Century (MAHG 5016 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Michael R. Hayse
Date: September 6 – December 12, 2016 | Thursday| 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing HRC
This course analyzes the major political, social, economic and intellectual developments of twentieth-century Europe, the nationalist and ethnic antagonisms that contributed to the First World War, the rise of National Socialism and other fascist movements in the wake of the Great War and the Great Depression, and the causes of World War II and the Holocaust, the transformation and division of Europe at the epicenter of the Cold War, and the reemergence of ethnic strife following the collapse of Communism in 1989.

Genocide Prevention Research Seminar (MAHG/GPC 5033 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Elisa von Joeden-Forgey
Date: September 6 – December 15, 2016
Location: Course Online (Fulfills GPC requirement)
This course is a Genocide Prevention Certificate (GPC) requirement. In this research seminar students will pursue independent research on a specific country and a subject related to the genocide prevention protocols outlined in the UN Framework for Atrocity Prevention (2012). Through small group Skype meetings as well as optional trips to NYC, topics and research progress will be discussed with the course instructor as well as with staff from the UN Office of the Special Advisor on Genocide Prevention. Students’ final reports for the course will be deposited with the UN office.

The History of the Holocaust (MAHG/GPC 5000- 3 Credits)
Instructor: Raz Segal
Date: September 6 – December 15, 2016 | Monday | 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing HRC (Fulfills MAHG & GPC requirement)
This course will examine the historical events and context which led to the rise of Hitler and fascism, the ideology of Nazism, and the political structures of National Socialist rule in Germany, as well as the roots of anti-Semitism, the implementation of the Final Solution, the structure and purpose of the ghettos and death camps, efforts to resist the Nazis, the actions and motivations of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in various European countries, and efforts to help and rescue Jews and other victims of the Nazis during the Holocaust. Some attention also will be given to the aftermath of the Holocaust and attempts to bring major Nazi criminals to justice.

The Holocaust and Genocide Education (MAHG 5003- 3 Credits)
Instructor: Mary Johnson
Date: September 6 – December 15, 2016 | Wednesday| 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing HRC
This is a hands-on experience designed for those wishing to comply with the requirements of the New Jersey Holocaust/genocide mandate or prepare for other venues. There is in-depth examination of current pedagogy, teaching methods, materials and curriculum development with three Education courses, each providing a different subject focus: Social Studies; Language Arts; Representation in Art, Film and Music. Any of the three may be selected to satisfy the core requirement. Note: MAHG 5003 may be taken three (3) times provided topics vary.

Perpetrator Behavior and Genocide Prevention (MAHG/GPC 5037- 3 Credits)
Instructor: James Waller
Date: September 6 – December 15, 2016
Location: Course Online (Fulfills GPC elective)
This course is a Genocide Prevention Certificate (GPC) elective. This course will focus on perpetrator behavior and motivation in genocide and mass atrocity. Case studies, also focusing on the judicial consequences, will be drawn from the Holocaust, Cambodia, Latin America, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Rwanda, and child soldiers. In addition to understanding how ordinary people come to commit genocide and mass atrocity, this course will focus on the implications of that understanding for prevention of such ordinary evil.

Selected Topics with the Ida E. King Distinguished Scholar of Genocide Studies
(MAHG 5007- 3 Credits)
Instructor: Elizabeth R. Baer
Date: September 6 – December 15, 2016 | Tuesday| 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Main Campus E Wing HRC
Though it is little known, the Germans committed the first genocide of the 20th century in their colony in Africa between 1904-1907, killing 80% of the Herero people and 50% of the Nama. Historians have begun to trace links between the methodology and ideology which led to this genocide and that of the Nazis during the Holocaust. Tracing such links is called the “continuity thesis,” and this idea remains controversial among historians. In order to study these links, students will read some historical essays arguing for and against the controversial continuity thesis, excerpts from memoirs, fiction, and films. Students will look at the ways in which the genocide in Africa was communicated to the German population and ask whether this laid the groundwork for their acceptance of racial hierarchies during the Third Reich. Students will also look at links between German imperialism and the 1994 Rwandan genocide. The class will be discussion based and will require two written projects: a short paper early in the term and a research paper near the close of the term.

MAHG & GPC Courses – Summer 2016

Literature of the Holocaust (MAHG 5020 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Dr. Maryann McLoughlin
Summer Session I: May 16, 2016 – June 27, 2016
Location: Online Course
This course is a Holocaust (H) elective. This course appraises the literary response to the Shoah in fiction as well as non-fiction, poetry as well as prose. These works provide insight into the complexity of the conditions and situations endured during the Holocaust. Participants in the course analyze the texts for the ways in which they express the “inexpressible” and for how they deepen our understanding both of the historical experience and of the individual experience of the Holocaust.

Transitional Justice and Collective Memory (MAHG 5039 -3 Credits)
Instructor: Dr. Kerry Whigham
Summer Session III: June 29, 2016 – August 10, 2016
Location: Online Course (Fulfills GPC elective)
This course is a Genocide Prevention Certificate (GPC) elective. This course will examine the various ways societies can and have dealt with past violence and human rights abuses—a field otherwise known as transitional justice. The course will focus both on traditionally recognized modes of transitional justice (criminal prosecutions, truth confessions, institutional reform, and reparations), but also more novel forms that are not as often discussed (memorialization and the creation of memory sites, cultural outreach, economic reform, and education). We will develop a deeper understanding of “collective memory” and its role in transitional justice and prevention. Finally, the course will place a special emphasis on the (potential) role of civil society and grassroots activism in shaping transitional justice strategies.

Study Seminar to the Sites (MAHG 5022 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Dr. Michael Hayse
Summer Session I: May 10, 2016 – June 27, 2016
Location: Hybrid Course that includes a Faculty Led Study Tour to France, Belgium, and the Netherlands
The Study Tour may serve as a Capstone Experience. Under the guidance of a qualified specialist, this course offers a study seminar combined with travel to Holocaust sites in Europe. In addition to other assignments, students produce a research paper or equivalent project on a designated topic related to the sites included on the travel itinerary.

MAHG Courses – Spring 2016
Art and Propaganda Under National Socialism (MAHG 5013 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Dr. Marion Hussong
Meeting Days: Mondays | 6:00pm-9:00pm
Location: Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center Classroom
This course is a Holocaust (H) elective. Formerly titled: Nazi Art and Propaganda. This course examines National Socialist uses of the arts for propaganda purposes. Beginning with an overview of the so-called “degenerate art” of Expressionism, we will move on to investigate how Nazi Germany employed architecture, sculpture, graphic design and painting, music, and even landscape design as ideological tools.

Holocaust, Memory, and Commemoration (MAHG 5036 – 3 Credits)
Instructor: Dr. Michael Hayse
Meeting Days: Tuesdays | 6:00pm-9:00pm
Location: Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center Classroom
The enormity of the Holocaust challenged the human capacity for comprehension. This course examines the struggles and debates over forms of commemoration, over the incorporation of the Shoah into national historical narratives, and over the symbolic representation of “memory” as memorials, museums, and sites of destruction. In this seminar, we will explore how collective memory of trauma is shaped, drawing on recent scholarship on “history and memory.”

The Armenian Genocide (MAHG 5030 – 3 Credits)
Meeting Days: Wednesdays | 6:00pm-9:00pm
Location: Unified Science Center 145
This course is a Genocide (G) elective. This course covers the history of the Armenian genocide from the end of the 19th century and into the 21ist. Topics we will cover include the cultural history of the Armenians in the Ottoman empire, the long-term causes of the genocide, the genocidal process, post-genocide efforts towards justice, the Armenian diaspora, and genocide denial, memory and commemoration.

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